True Stuff that I Made Up

PLEASE NOTE: The entries which are published at this site are solely my personal and sometimes whimsical musings. For information regarding my political positions and proposals, please visit www.LarryKump.us.

Further, this website is devoutly dedicated to all of my friends and associates, both early and late, who have mentored and influenced me. However, being who they are, the majority of them have been late most of the time.

  Also, check out my personal entry at Mormon.org.

Friday, June 30, 2006

Bob Moats Chimes In (in response to my previous entry)

While you feel you have guardian angels, I do as well, though not to the extent of which you have experienced.
I feel, Larry, that you are the guardian angel of others.
You have endless energy in "watching" over us in the workplace.
You have fought and continue to fight to make our workplace environment safe, often times handling things before we are even aware there was an issue.
I feel safe knowing that you are on my side.
Bob Moats

4 Comments:

Blogger Bookslinger said...

I'll add my "Amen!" to what Bob said.

In both big ways and small ways we all have opportunities to be angels to each other. Both the guardian type and the messenger type.

Shortly after joining the church in 1982, I was in the Sunday school class for non-members and new members on a cold spring day at the LDS church on West 56th Street in Indianapolis.

An elderly-appearing street bum, with weathered skin, wearing several layers of clothing, a piece of rope for a belt, and scary looking hair had come into our church.

He had been shepherded into our class, and during the mingling afterwards, one of the class leaders, Cheryl Larsen (or Larson), whom I thought to be a stereotypical prim-and-proper "church lady" was talking to him.

After initially thinking "She's wasting her time, he's just here for a hand-out, or just to get warm" I noted how Sister Larsen was treating him. She was talking to him as if he were a VIP. I listened to her words, and observed her demeanor and body English, and I was amazed. If the mayor or the governor had walked into our class, she could not have treated them with any greater respect than she was giving this man whom I had dismissed as a "street bum."

Flash forward two and a half years to when I was a full-time missionary, a "senior companion" training a new missionary who had just arrived in the field.

We were walking on the dirt streets of Bucay Ecuador and passed by two elderly men sitting on a bench. One elbowed the other, pointed to us, and said in a frail old man's voice "Those guys are angels!"

We turned to do a double-take, and after turning away again my greenie companion made a dismissive hand gesture and said to me "Crazy ol' coot."

Though his clothes and hair were different, the man bore a slight resemblance to the "street bum" in our Sunday school class that day.
Then Sister Larsen's example came to mind. I said to my companion, "But he's right."

I decided to follow her example, and treat this man, who "recognized" us as God's messengers, without respect to his person.

We eventually taught him the missionary lessons, and he was baptized.

Angelic service in a small church classroom in Indiana, led to the delivery of an angelic message almost 3000 miles away.

1:01 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I concur.
Dorothy Keys
Bunker Hill, WV

3:31 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Add another "Amen!!!"

7:16 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thanks, Larry!
You're the glue that holds us together.
A grateful coworker

5:32 PM  

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